How To Clean A Wool Rug

Step By Step Professional Guide

How To Clean A Wool Rug

How To Clean A Wool Rug – It truly doesn’t get any cozier or more luxurious than a plush, high-quality wool rug. A strategically placed wool rug can elevate the look and feel any room with its warmth and elegance. It’s a great piece of accessory, especially if you are looking to spruce up your home without getting any major remodeling done. A wool area rug of good quality can get a little pricey, but consider it an investment because, with proper care and maintenance, it can last for many years and look just as good as the day you first bought it. Spots and spills are inevitable, especially in a lively home with precious children and pets. For simple stains, surface dirt, and upkeep, and for spot cleaning wool rugs,  you can definitely DIY and hold off on calling the professional cleaners. Keep reading for a step by step guide on how to clean a wool rug.

Article at a Glance

Wool Rug Cleaning Supplies

  • Vacuum
  • Rug shampoo
  • Beater brush
  • Clean towels
  • Clean sponges
  • Baking soda
  • White vinegar
  • A clean brush with stiff bristles

Rug Care 101

All the Tools You Need to Make an Informed Area Rug Choice

Step By Step Guide On How To Clean A Wool Rug

Step One: Beat it

This is crucial for a wool rug that sees a lot of foot traffic. When you track a lot of dirt, soil, and grime into your home, expect them to end up in your rugs. The best way to get rid of this dry surface area dirt is to beat it out of your rug using a beater bar, a specially contoured metal agitator with or without a brush attached. You can also use a good old broom in lieu of an agitator. Take your rug outside and hang it on a clothesline or something similar and start whacking it. The repeated vibrating motion should help dislodge dry dirt clinging to the wool fibers.

Step Two: Brush it out

Pet hair, human hair, and other particles will periodically get stuck in the fibers of your wool rug. Shaggier wool rugs with longer fibers are especially prone to this kind of surface dirt. The last thing you want to do at this stage is to get your rug wet as it might cause the hair to embed even further into the rug. Instead, brush it out with a clean brush with stiff bristles to make sure you get everything. Brush along the direction of the nap of the fibers, not against, so you don’t ruin your rug.

Step Three: Vacuum It

Vacuuming regularly will help keep your carpet or rug clean. However, for wool rugs, vacuum no more than twice a month and alternate directions to protect the wool fibers and avoid crushing it. For a clean wool area rug, one tip you shouldn’t neglect when it comes to vacuuming: don’t forget to vacuum the underside.

Step Four: Shampoo

This is crucial for a wool rug that sees a lot of foot traffic. When you track a lot of dirt, soil, and grime into your home, expect them to end up in your rugs. The best way to get rid of this dry surface area dirt is to beat it out of your rug using a beater bar, a specially contoured metal agitator with or without a brush attached. You can also use a good old broom in lieu of an agitator. Take your rug outside and hang it on a clothesline or something similar and start whacking it. The repeated vibrating motion should help dislodge dry dirt clinging to the wool fibers.

Step Five: Dry Thoroughly

Drying your rug thoroughly is crucial after shampooing or getting your rug wet. If a rug doesn’t dry properly, it will be a hotbed for mold and mildew. Start by pressing a dry, clean towel or a clean sponge against your damp rug to help absorb some of the wetness. After which, use a fan or a space heater to dry the rug the rest of the way through. If your rug is small enough, take it outside to let it dry under direct sunlight. Sunlight is not only the most effective way to dry your rug, it’s also a natural disinfectant and will rid your rug of germs. Sun-drying is also pretty effective in removing stains.

Step Six: Brush It Out Again

Your rug might feel stiff, tough or crusty right after you dry it out. If this happens, vacuum it gently or brush it out with a clean, soft-bristled brush to make it soft and pliable once more.

Step Seven: Spot Cleaning

For small spills than need to be cleaned as soon as possible, use warm water and a few drops of rug shampoo or a mild liquid soap mixed with white vinegar to clean the affected area. To wet the stain, blot with a clean cloth or paper towel. Blot, rather than rub so you don’t spread the stain. To dry, blot with a clean cloth and towel as well. Repeat as necessary but don’t rub too much as you will wear out the fibers. Once the area is dry, you can also sprinkle some baking soda on the affected area. Let the fibers of the rug absorb the baking soda by leaving it for about half an hour and then dust or vacuum off the excess.

When To Call In the Professionals

No matter how fastidious you are when it comes to cleanliness, there will come a time to call in a professional cleaning service who can do a thorough deep cleaning or dry clean your wool rug or steam clean your wool rug. 

This can be done around once a year and is great for wool rugs, viscose rugs, and other rugs made of materials that will need extra pampering and TLC like antique rugs, and those made from natural fibers such as sisal wool rugs, or fragile flokati materials.

As a bonus, professional cleaning services is also great for deodorizing rugs and getting rid of unpleasant odors.  

Wool Rug

Take our 30 second quiz will reveal your perfect rug style based on your individual personality

Your design style will be compared to thousands of customers in real-time to display results that best fit your interior taste.